Camera Lens Shift

rhino
unhandled
camera
lens

(Przemysław Doliwa) #1

I was wondering whats the best possible option for camera matching i need to shift lens in vertical is there any way to do this in Rhino?


#2

maxwell render has a lense shift via the plugIn. (as of now plugin only for Rhino 5)

rhino itself has “two point perspective”, but it does not work with all render plugins and does not have an option to shift either.
image


#3

Hello D-W, if you are V-Ray user, you can type _vrayCamGuessVertical or go through here:

Cheers
Jonas


(Przemysław Doliwa) #4

@dk2079, @Jonish i use Thea and i can also shift it via plug or in studio but i wanted to shift cam in viewport but i can’t find any option - i have to precisely match real photo from brid eye view but i have already verticals straightened.

@pascal is there any workaround for that ? / test command ? or @dale any possibility to force similiar behaviour via any script?

I’m adding photo just to be clear what behaviour i’m looking for.

@dk2079 hmm t4r works in two point persp but will this solve my shift problem? i see now that photo with straightened verticals seems to be similar to two point persp but is it indeed two point - it is so easy ?


#5

I see… tilt+shift.

have you tried the two point perspective? I don’t know if Thea can pick that up for direct rendering, but I would not know of any other way to keep verticals straight in Rhino other than that.


(Przemysław Doliwa) #6

@dk2079 i think this is what i need - photo with straight verticals becames indeed two point perspective :thinking: ?


#7

Yes, that is the term (TwoPointPerspective=Straight Verticals).
In Rhino it is a bit difficult to use TwoPointPerspective, especially if you try to photomatch, as it will not allow you to easily move the camera target up/down. It’s there, but that mode is underdeveloped.


(Jeremy) #8

Hi D-W,

If the Canon lens is intended to show the behaviour you want then it appears you are looking for tilt, not shift, ie you want to extend (or reduce) the depth of field on a significant plane in your picture, rather than keeping verticals parallel in your image whilst looking upwards