Why does saving a 240 MB file take 25 seconds when it only takes 2 seconds to copy it?


#1

We are working with a server where we get over 100MB transfer speeds but saving the 240 MB document from within Rhino takes 25 seconds. If I save it to the local SSD under a new name and then copy that file to server it only takes 2 seconds, so the write speed is good. The computers are linked through a Gigabit switch.

Could Rhino write the file to memory prior to saving it to the network location to help speed this up?

I know it is a problem for users who work on wireless lans as well.


#3

Oh, sorry, this fell out prior to posting:
Saving to the SSD takes less than tree seconds,
Copying it from the SSD to the server takes two seconds.

If the compression uses 20 seconds extra (25 vs 3+2) due to saving to the server then I guess Rhino should use a scratchdisk for saving.


#5

I was more thinking in the manner of saving to the scratchdisk (SSD) and then move the file to the desired destination. I can make a proof of concept python script that does that, but that wouldn’t be a good solution as the “last files used” list wouldn’t be updated among other things.


#6

maybe your headline is misguiding?

you actually say it takes more time to store directly over network than it would do saving to ssd and then copying?

the extra loss of time can occur of course because it probably sends packages there and back for parity reason. so if you want rhino to save it to a server with saving it first to ssd and then copying it if thats faster then you may have to make a script.


#7

Yes!
STORING LOCALLY and then MOVING it to the network destination is 5 times faster than
STORING DIRECTLY to network destination :smiley:


(Willem Derks) #8

Or vanilla Rhino has a saving process that actively prevents unnecessary data transfer over the network:
Get the file ready locally and send it to the network location in one go.

-Willem


#9

sounds like a solution? but what is vanilla rhino?


(Willem Derks) #10

Vanilla is an expression to indicate the basic version of something. In this case the basic version of Rhino without additional plugins or scripts.

-Willem