Stretch Command (Similar to AutoCAD's) for Drafting Purposes

I swear by Rhino, and hate AutoCAD. But working at an architecture firm this summer, and being forced to use AutoCAD, I’ve picked up a few useful tools of which I was previously unaware. One of them being the Stretch command…

In Rhino, when I want to enlarge a floor plan, for example, I end up individually moving walls, extending the lines to close off the rooms I disrupted, and, in all other ways, making a pretty big mess for myself. But the AutoCAD “Stretch” command has the option of drawing a “crossing-polygon”. It’s extremely handy! Basically anything completely in the polygon you draw will be moved the distance you indicate, while any lines that are crossed by the edge of the polygon will be stretched, or lengthened, to maintain a continuous line. This saves a bit of time that would normally be used to close up and clean up your floor plan.

I’m not aware of anything like this in Rhino. I’ve used the Scale1D command before, but it scales everything, rather than simply extending the lines. This leads to worse problems, making me measure out everything, and readjust wall thickness, etc.

Is there something like the AutoCAD “Stretch” command with the “crossing-polygon” feature? Is there a way to incorporate this in the next build? If so, would it be possible to make it 3D as well as 2D?

If I posted this in the wrong forum, please direct me to the right forum (especially one concerning any Rhino V6 wishlists).

Thank you!

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The closest thing we have is to select the curves and surfaces involved, press F10 to turn on Control Points, Window or Crossing Window select them, and drag them out where you want them. Then F11 to turn the points off.
It’s much like AutoCAD’s Stretch command, but you have to turn on control points first.

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For the 3D part of the wish, I would also check out moveEdge, moveFace, and SolidPtOn, they all can be used in combination with crossing windows, and can be very handy for re-sizing things.

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Hi Grant.

In addition to other answers you can you sub-object selection via crtl+shift and drag a window. It will select all parts of 3d objects, you can then move at will. Most convenient would be to turn the gumball on for that.

-Willem

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Thank you for the replies! I will certainly give each of these a try, to see which fits best with what I need.

The functionality that the OP described would be super helpful, and none of the proposed solutions really do the trick. Rhino has been doing a great job of making its 2D drawing more robust over the years, but this is one area where AutoCAD still has an advantage.

this (ctrl+shift+drag select) is what i have been looking for for so long! thanks!

I really feel you.
I hate the Rhino Stretch method…

bandicam 2021-04-18 10-04-27-482_Trim_Trim|video

Hello,

When you are an AutoCAD user the stretch command is confusing and it took for me as well some time to understand it. I’ve created two aliases ( '_PointsOn PAUSE _move

! _SolidPtOn PAUSE _move) that are working but I must select the objects twice. The first time for the pointsOn command and afterwards for the move command.

Has got somebody a MACRO doing it with one selection and it would be nice that the command would select PointsOn or SolidPtOn depending on the selected objects.

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Hello @pascal do you how to make this macro ? I think it’s would be very useful to several people.
Thank you,
Wolf

Now, if we could just convince Autodesk to add a Scale1D command!

Reason AutoCAD won’t do a 1d scale is, most probably, because this would break the parametricity of circles, arcs in a polyline, rectangles etc. Those can be changed numerically, unlike in Rhino. After a scale they would be ellipses or parallelograms.
However, I wouldn’t mind if parametricity would be lost. I don’t like AutoCAD either, and missed a scale1d often.

On the other hand, it would be great if Rhino would keep parameters on it’s primitives (circles, rectangles, boxes…), without Grasshopper.
It might complicate things, though, and McNeel seemed to opt for simplicity.