Remember CAD in the old days? Pepperidge farm remembers

unhandled

#1

(Chris Kuether ) #2

I cannot understand your question. :slight_smile:


(Jakob Normand) #3

Hi @Alisha_Meredith

The short answer is yes, there are lots of alternatives. The long answer is no, not really. I’ll try to keep the long answer short: It all depends on what you need, what you do, what your budget is etc. Rhino can do a LOT of different things for different people: Industrial design, mechanical design,algorithmic design (Grasshopper), architecture, boats, jewelry, art and installations, 2D/vector graphics and the list goes on and on - all for a very small price; at least compared to other programs in the field of 3D CAD - and with a tool set that is actually both simple for the beginner (and those who don’t need a lot of bells and whistles) and sufficient for the advanced user. But again, it all comes down to what you need to do. So tell us a bit about your needs, and I’m sure someone will chime in with possible alternatives.

HTH, Jakob


#4

Simple answer:

If you need spanner, use spanner.
If you need screwdriver, use screwdriver.

Semi-professional answer. Tools that completely covers Rhino are Microstation and Microstation as well as Microstation. And maybe you could try Microstation.


(Jakob Normand) #5

@onrender - Isn’t Microstation arch. and mech. only? I’ve never heard or seen anyone use it for product, jewelry, vehicle… anything with a complex curvature, really; but I might be mistaken?

-Jakob


#6

It has an extended nurbs library so it is suitable for anything. Check it out. The cost is significantly higher.


#8

These days, for the most part I believe. I used Microstation ‘back-in-the-day’ between Schlumberger MacBRAVO (google that one) and discovering Rhino…

Edit: never mind…googled it for you


#10

Yea, Easter egg hunt. Not much out there. Good history stuff you found.

MacBRAVO! was Schlumberger’s foray from VAX Superminis to the desktop, and they chose Apple exclusively for their ‘new’ desktop platform. It was really good stuff for a brief time, perhaps the best. However, they went head-to-head with AutoCAD and Pro/E who chose that ‘other’ platform.

We know who won that competition…Solidworks…:wink:


#11

Autocad + 3dmax :persevere:


#12

I’ve used MOI 3D http://moi3d.com/ which is a stripped down version of Rhino. Developed by Michael Gibson who was one of the original developers of Rhino.
It is super easy to use and Michael is always very helpful.


#13

A trip down memory lane… nice. In the early 90s, our engineers used I-DEAS by SDRC, but that probably no longer exists?

In 1992 we designers got Adobe Dimensions, the powerful 3D and rendering software ; )

0 splash screen


(Gustavo Fontana) #14

Never Forget alias_sketch_01
alias_sketch_02
alias_sketch_03


#15

That’s a nice one!

Now where are all my old software boxes and SGI boxes ; )

Some nice software industry history


#16

Nice. I totally forgot about Alias Sketch. Was awesome, for a moment!

I think I still have some Sketch renderings archived…assuming they can be opened.

I need to dig them up and compare how they hold up to Keyshot.


#17

Funny, I held on to one ‘purple’ SGI box way past its usefulness just because it was so pretty…(and expensive)


(Gustavo Fontana) #18

No need to dig up old boxes. Just compare KeyShot to Rhino Render. Same vintage quality, I think they are probably waiting to become so old looking that it will look cool again.


#19

so thats who did MOI, i wondered why it looked and felt like rhino


#20

Remember Bryce?


#21

no one talk about sketchup?


#22

Anyone remember when screenshots had to be developed in a photo lab, to be picked up 2-3 days later and then sent by mail, in an envelope, to clients?