Laptop hardware minimums for learning Rhino?

Hello.

I’ve read this …
https://www.rhino3d.com/6/system_requirements

I’m coming from a very old HP workstation running Sketchup. CAD is for personal use only. No commercial interest or heavy utilization. I’d never approach the limitations of Sketchup, much less Rhino. However I’d like to learn to use something more powerful and flexible.

Can anyone be so kind to recommend a 500 dollar laptop best suited to learning Rhino? I do no gaming. I expect to use a desktop monitor when not travelling with the laptop. Reconditioned is certainly an option. No larger than 15 inch. 14 perferred.

Thank you very much.

It’s probably easier to post a few options here and get recommendations based on that. Computer prices depend a lot on where you are located.

I might stretch the budget a bit. Is this about as good as it gets for 700USD for CAD work?

hmm if you don’t need rendering and are planning to use this for plans and drawings, then you could go with no GPU and built in graphics with a more powerful cpu and more ram.

Could you link one example of a laptop as you describe it?

I rediscovered an interest in drawing with Sketchup. Been using it for about a decade now.

My interest in creative arts had migrated away from painting, drawing, and photography to the more immediate and functional. Welding and fabrication of objects primarily for use, though visually satifying to me, but less and less for “art’s sake” alone. Id quit drawing almost altogether.

A decade ago i was visiting the Gugenheim museum and lucked into an exhibit of industrial design. Machinery, durable goods, vehicles, pots and pans… toasters and vacuum cleaners. My date was bemused by my indifference to the “higher” art that occupied most of the exhibit space that day. But i was smitten. I’d been welding and tinkering and designing in my basement shop for some years at that point.

Shortly after that Sketchup reawakened a love of drawing. It was so empowering to conceive useful, beautiful objects on the screen, rotate and zoom, adjust visual balance, elegance, beauty on the fly, until it satisfied… save the object, then transfer measurements from the screen to the shop and see my imagination through to a useful, beautifully useful, object. How cool is that?

I need to replace my ancient hp laptop. While shopping online i spent some time in various forums to get a feel for the best choice of CAD software to graduate to/toward. Rhino3d kept rising to my attention.

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I would strongly disagree on this one. Depending on your model and display mode used (since V6 I use Arctic a lot) a good graphics card is a pleasure. Better that than a slight longer wait for booleans and such

Hmm I generally only use wireframe and grasshopper.

From experience with running a large grasshopper script, having the extra cpu and ram was significantly more useful that having any graphics. In fact, my laptop with the newer cpu and slightly more power, but on built in graphics runs my scripts in shorter time compared to my pc with the extra graphics.

If the user is more into just Rhino, I guess having a graphics for display would result in a smoother experience. Based on his description and use case, I think the smoother graphics would probably be more in line with what he will be doing. so the ideapad actually looks like a good pick. Maybe just have some stand so that the laptop isn’t sitting on the desk without airflow.