Default Settings for rendered Viewport


#1

We have trouble with the default settings for the rendered Viewport in Rhino.
the Setting “Advanced GPU Lighting” and “shadows” make our machines so slow that you cant work on large interior design projects anymore. I wonder why these buttons are on by default??? - It took me ages to find out what was the reason for the incredible slow Computers.

We use a windows 7 64bit machine with i7 Core 3,4 ghz, 16gb RAM and a Geforce GT 630

Does anybody have an explanaiotion here?
That would be great!

Chers,
Julian


(Margaret Becker) #2

Hi, Julian

Sorry for the slow reply.

It’s always a problem to decide what should be on by default. If these are on, large models slow down, if they are off, some other features don’t work and people have to search around for those. We will try to clean this up in a future release.

@jeff. Any thoughts on this topic?


(Jeff Lasor) #3

The only thing I’ll add to Margaret’s comments, is that if things are taking you ages to discover or figure out, then you’re waiting too long to post a question. We probably could have saved you some time had you posted something about slow frame rates.

Also, the Rendered Mode is the only mode that has these settings on by default, and is usually used for visualization. So yes, if you plan on working on large projects and use Rendered mode as your default working mode, then you’ll probably want to keep shadows off, as well as advanced lighting…although the results will most likely look very poor quality. Perhaps a better approach would be for you to create a copy of the Rendered mode and customize that instead, but I’ll leave that up to you.

-J


#4

Hi, thank you for your reply.

We use the rendered mode only to apply and adjust the textures.
The more realistic the viewport – the better, but because we always build the whole interior for the renderings (retail interior design projects) there is quite a bit adjusting and
Moving cameras during this step.

I was just wondering why a brand new computer with a Geforce GT 630 with 2gig ram and a cpu i7-4770 with 16 gig ram is still performing so poorly with Rhino, while some incredible complex 3D computergames are running without any trouble….

Thank you very much!
With regards

J.Hensch

Von: jeff [mailto:steve@mcneel.com]
Gesendet: Freitag, 6. Juni 2014 20:56
An: Julian Hensch | mhp-Architekten
Betreff: [McNeel Forum] Default Settings for rendered Viewport

[http://discourse.mcneel.com/user_avatar/discourse.mcneel.com/jeff/45/9504.png]

jeffhttp://discourse.mcneel.com/users/jeff
June 6

The only thing I’ll add to Margaret’s comments, is that if things are taking you ages to discover or figure out, then you’re waiting too long to post a question. We probably could have saved you some time had you posted something about slow frame rates.

Also, the Rendered Mode is the only mode that has these settings on by default, and is usually used for visualization. So yes, if you plan on working on large projects and use Rendered mode as your default working mode, then you’ll probably want to keep shadows off, as well as advanced lighting…although the results will most likely look very poor quality. Perhaps a better approach would be for you to create a copy of the Rendered mode and customize that instead, but I’ll leave that up to you.


(Willem Derks) #5

Hi Julius,

Please note that these games are optimized in every possible way to do very specific tasks known in advance. The geometry is setup for visualization and interaction within known limits, making it far easier to use all sorts of trickery.

Rhino on the other hand is a tool for creating data unknown in advance. It is made to accommodate all sorts of models, data and workflows on a large variety of systems.

Apart from that McNeel has a budget that is of a different magnitude than that of the average large gaming developer. So resources are more limited and are subject to a different prioritization: Visualization and model interaction is just a part of the 3D modeler that Rhino is, where in games that is the core of the software.

-Willem


#6

Apples and oranges.
If you were to extract an environment (interior or exterior) from one of those games and take it apart you’d find that there’s very little actual geometry and the texture maps are all baked down. In a game pipeline you’re given an upper limit of size that you have to work to and your work will not be given a green light if it exceeds that limit. If you were to compare one of those environments to one of yours I think you’d find yours are larger by several magnitudes.