Maze from mesh

Hello,

I just saw this, and think it’s super beautiful:


Source page: https://www.grasshopper3d.com/forum/topics/maze-from-mesh

@laurent_delrieu, does it work with vector curves as input? And could you share the script for that? :star_struck:

The silhouette is from a black and white image


Maze tool

You could thicken the paths using classical tools or with the tools I describe

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Hello!

Wow. Sounds very advanced.

I would wanted to try the same, but with a vector shape. Then this happened:


a.3dm (3.3 MB)
a.gh (15.8 KB)

Do you know how to let it look like more similar to yours?

Wish you a good day :sparkles:

Hey, I am still at such a point:
ani

How did you do it with an image?

Hello
I gave you a solution why not trying to understand it and then reuse it. It is not very difficult to use your shape instead of an image.

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maze

I love the smell of mazes in the morning. :sweat_smile: :joy: :rofl:

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Cool you choose quad remesh. At @cucumber here one way to make quad mesh. Up to you if you want a grid that follow the geometry like @diff-arch or a grid…

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Okay, so this was before:

Then I tried to use a curve and Boundary Surfaces:


But the borders were still a rectangle.

So I tried it this way:

But then it looks like what I have already shown. So there must be some type of component that is missing? Is there a component like Mesh Plate in Shape of Curve?

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That’s cool! :slight_smile: But hooow?

Hello
you are incredible, it seems that you work with Grasshopper for some time and you asked so many questions so you must not be a newbie.
My Maze component need a mesh, each face is a cell. So here you need quad cells.
How to make quads

  1. use QuadRemesh like @diff-arch with your surface or
  2. use a grid other your surface, make sure to take a Boundary (B) that covers your shape, you can use bounding box.

    Then look at each center of the mesh faces if it is on the face or not. You could use brep closest point or something like that.

    If on keep it and redo a mesh.
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Thanks.

I read the book “Mazes for Programmers” by James Buck a few years ago, and implemented a couple of ways to generate them from the book in GHPython. The book has examples in Ruby.
I came up with a way to “grow” mazes on meshes instead of abstract grids, like described in the book. Meshes are after all kinda like three-dimensional grids, if you think about it.
Laurent has interpreted correctly that I mesh the text outline with the Quad Remesh component from Grasshopper and than feed that mesh to my custom Python component/script to process.

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With each mesh you can effectively generate two mazes at the same time: one from the edges (pink) and one from the connected face centers (or dual mesh) (orange).

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Different mesh tessellations yield different mazes.
Here’s an example for a triangulated mesh. The above one was a quad mesh.

This maze was created from a hexagonal mesh, which is the dual of the triangulated mesh.

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And differents logics could be applied





And for @cucumber

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Well. I am definitely not a professional, for sure not talented, but curious. So I just ask questions und hope someday I won’t have questions anymore. :neutral_face: How much time did you need until you felt confident with Grasshopper?

And thank you so much for your explanation! I’ll try that tonight.

Super interesting! Did you learn Python from scratch to be able to do things like this, or did you find a way to do it in the context of your idea?

Super nice!

Looks amazing! Thank youuu

To have no questions is quite impossible. Keep the question but try to well understand what each component does before asking new questions.

Hard to tell. I began more than 11 years ago !!!

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For sure. I think if I start to learn something new, it’s like jumping into an another world, and and slowly need to understand how this type of life is working. I’m definitely still at a position where I’m wondering why everything is the way it is, rather than being able to find some sort of routine.

Wow! I heard about it for the first time in my life last year. It was written about it in a book on parametric architecture. Something about it magically attracted me. I hope in 10 years I will be able to help here some people :slight_smile: