SVG output fails to maintain scale

Hi everyone,

I am having an issue in V7 where i try to and seem to export curves to SVG for later use in Vectric aspire. Each time i export the curves are scaled in correctly. I am setting the output settings to 1:1 and have had success exporting curves from Inkscape to Vectric with scaling preserved perfectly.

The images show the size in Rhino, My export settings and the resulting scale issue in Vectric. The 150mm width becomes 120mm after export.

Is there a better way to get curves out? I am CNC machining things that have to match and maintain tolerance with 3d printed components created in then exported from Rhino.

The only work around has been to do my CNC design in Rhino then recreate them in Vectric using the inbuilt tools but this adds time and effort to the work flow.

Any help would be appreciated.
Dan.



I’m old school, but I would never trust .svg (or .pdf for that matter) for precision curve machining. I would export .dxf or .iges.

1 Like

Hi Dan - does this come in correctly?

150.zip (448 Bytes)

-Pascal

Hi Helvetosaur,

I will give it a try tonight, initial research seems to show Vectric will accept DXF. I will prep an export once im home and advise.

Hi Pascal,

I will run this tonight and feedback the results. Thanks everyone for all the help on this.

Hi Pascal,

Opened in vectric with a width of 120mm. When imported in to Rhino it shows as 150mm. Im guessing Vectric has the issue translating the scale, the ratio between Rhino export/Vectric import seems consistent at 1.25:1.

DXF export resulted in a perfect 1:1 representation in Vectric.

I tested an SVG from Rhino in Adobe Illustrator using your setting with one exception.
I changed the DPI to 94.5 and the output measures 149.996 in Illustrator.

Unfortunately it appears the DPI setting only uses a single decimal place, so the 94.5 DPI is the closest you can get to to producing 150mm result, all else being equal to what is shown in your settings.

This is why I don’t recommend any of these types of formats for precision machining. Anything designed for paper printing and based on points or dpi will never be 100% accurate, there will always be a conversion. Use a format designed for exchanging CAD data…