Rhino on Linux?

It seems to be as always: they add some features (that actually are not thaaat bad) but at a high privacy cost. A good friend of mine is pretty close to Microsoft and told me that indeed the AI will be able to make annoying tasks easier, like organizing files, relevant searches within the mess we have on our harddrives (and floppy disks, haha) from the last 20 years, helping optimizing workflow etc. Surely it’s not entirely stupid, but as you say, a little feature does NOT justify all the effort they are putting into gathering that information and I should not be forced to spend 3 days switching off all “features” after each forced update.

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@user2820 what’s the status on the documentation?

It now takes longer to attempt privacy–even for the user “privacy” settings on Windows 10/11 than it does to do an entire install of Linux Mint, with Cinnamon : )

[Ever notice that CC Cleaner finds stuff in Edge’s cache–even though you might not use it, ever.]

haha, it’s so annoying each time I set up a new windows. no cortana, no edge, no share-my-shoe-size-feature…
yeah, I’ve got a raspi as firewall: indeed windows prints more than just “hello” to the world.

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Thank you for the post. When it comes, this functionality is certainly not actually going to do what I want, so it and microsoft can kindly pound rocks for that alone. On top of that, the privacy concerns are grave indeed.

I’d be a total linux noob. It seems like the most repeated question I gotta post again: in 2024, where to start with linux?

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if you are very short on time start with WSL on windows
if you are short on time start with ubuntu
if you are time start with archlinux

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You can have a glimpse of several Linux distros straight into your browser:
DistroSea

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Also, it is fairly easy to download an ISO image of a distro, put it on an USB stick and boot your machine from that to get a feel of a live distro without actually installing it.

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Thanks everyone.

I’ve done a fair bit of distro hopping in the past, including most of the Ubuntu flavours, Debian, Manjaro and Mint Cinammon. I always end up going back to Mint, for me it’s the best.

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I’ve always liked Mint, but I couldn’t get it to install on my old laptop. I did manage to get Pop!OS installed and it runs very well.

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Ever tried Elementary OS? I’m quite the fan of it :slight_smile:

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No I haven’t, it does look good. Is it based on Debian like Mint/Ubuntu. The problem is Bricscad recommends Ubuntu, Fedora or OpenSuse so I’m limited to these.
Thanks!

Sorry just checked, it is based on Ubuntu LTS.
I’m going to have a look over the weekend…
Cheers

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You like your favourite Linux as long as you are not running into a problem or you can’t use/compile your apps, or you find no suited drivers etc. Then you are looking for alternatives and end up looking at your awesome GUI but wonder what to do with it. There are very good reasons to stick to mature and popular Distros or to Windows. This thread is ridiculous, as Linux is not an alternative at the moment for many usecases. Btw, I have seen too many bugs with Linux, therefore a VM or Docker Container is the best choice, because you can always go back to the initial state, before you messed up your system. I prefer Ubuntu because of the community and help you can get.

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Linux is a niche operating system that is not ignored in the CAD sector without good reason. It may certainly have its strengths but also many weaknesses (especially its distribution/use) and that is not insignificant. It is not without reason that it is supported by almost no major commercial software and I only know of Allplan, which indirectly supports Linux, but this version is only available under certain conditions (from very large companies that also bear the costs of development).

If I remember correctly you can run Plasticity, BricsCAD and VariCAD natively on Linux?

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@Cumberland
Don’t get me wrong but these programs are niche products and therefore not meaningful. Blender also runs on Linux but even if it is a good tool it is not meaningful.

Seems like you can run Fusion360 on Linux using Wine.

What usecases do you have in mind? Applications like Sketchup, Rhino, Revit don’t work on Linux for the same reason VHS doesn’t fit into DVD player. Doesn’t mean you couldn’t port a movie to any one of these media. It’s just a company making a choice to support either one. It’s also your choice to support such a company. I understand that from a user perspective things should just work™, but Linux users usually learn to see a bigger picture and trade off simplicity for flexibility aka freedom.

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