Rhino for Windows tutorials

#21

No @#$& Sherlock. Similarly to how a screwdriver is generally less efficient than this.

Where do I find this NURBS replacement, which is, minimally, equally effective in all respects, yet faster/easier?

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#22

NURBS dominate CAD market. Their main flaw is inability to cope with singularities and extraordinary vertices. Singularity is a vertice where many isocurves converge into a single point, for example, the apex of a cone. Extraordinary vertice is a place where total number of converging isocurves is different than 4 and 6. Singularities and extraordinary vertices are common in objects shaped like animals. If the NURBS object has these vertices, commands manipulating the object may fail. T-splines and subdivision surfaces are new kernels. They are not as mature as the NURBS, but they can cope with the singularities and extraordinary vertices, and they reduce the number of control points twofold in comparison with the NURBS when they describe organic surfaces (animals or plants). Some implementations of T-splines and subdivision surfaces are less accurate than NURBS.

Rhino 7 SubD kernel looks to me like quick, dirty, inaccurate kernel suitable for making organic blobs. It does not look like a revolution that will replace NURBS. I have invented better kernel than T-splines and subdivision surfaces, but I am far too busy to develop it into commercial product.

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(David Cockey) #23

What is the state of your invention? Have you prototyped it in code and tested it? Or is it a set of concepts which have not been implemented yet?

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#24

It is nothing more than basic idea - no coding.

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#25

Somehow you are too busy to develop your revolutionary cad kernel while at the same time spending much of your free time raving about it on the forums… Isn’t it ironic?

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#26

Yes, it is ironic. My real work is orders of magnitude more important than reporting Rhino bugs. I seem to be a perfectionist - any bug in Rhino bothers me so much that I have to report it.

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#27

Saving the world: one important job at a time.

No offence, I will gladly admit my scepticism was wrong when your innovation will take over the world.

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#28

Is this the same Andrew? That right there is some pretty serious stuff!

SPACE MANIFESTO

Prisoners of gravity, escape to outer space. Become cosmic nomads, the hunters of comets and the gatherers of asteroids. Spin cocoons of steel for your new forests and seas. And when you visit the Earth, step lightly, lest you destroy its fragile beauty.

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#29

Can tell about this (your idea) to the developers of the program

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(Litwinaa) #30

Hello,

Does anyone know of a good tutorial on the use of the wire cut command ?

Thank you,

Andy

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(Vanessa Steeg) #31

Hi @litwinaa - what exactly are you looking for? Do you want to understand how the command works or good use cases for the command? Something else?

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(Litwinaa) #32

Hello Vanessa,

Both to understand how the command works and good uses for it.

Thank you,

Andy

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(Vanessa Steeg) #33

@litwinaa - The command is very useful when you want to trim a solid but you want the result to still be a solid. Here’s the Help file video, https://docs.mcneel.com/rhino/6/help/en-us/index.htm#commands/wirecut.htm.

A link to a tutorial, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20rcbJ-N7fw

Attached a clip.

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(Litwinaa) #34

Hello Vanessa,

Thank you very much for the help with this command. I appreciate your comment, clip and links They are helpful.

Thank you,

Andy

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(Andrew Nowicki) #35

Phil Cook explains referencing geometry in Rhino 6 with blocks and worksessions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUCR0GXygUw

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(Andrew Nowicki) #36

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVcGfimf8yKmhoweDpKF4PQ/videos

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