Julia from MIT : high performance language with python-like syntax?

Dear all,

I was wondering if there were any kind of resources / experience / attempt to link rhino & grasshopper with Julia, an impressive new programming language from MIT ?

Julia is a high-level, high-performance dynamic programming language for technical computing, with syntax that is familiar to users of other technical computing environments.

My experience of Rhino & Grasshopper :

I’ve been working on rhino for the past 6 years and I have programmed structural analysis softwares for non linear analysis of elastic gridshells. The framework you give to guys like me with rhino & grasshopper is very powerful because we can focus on our specific knowledge and don’t spend hundreds of hours to develop even basic UI. It’s very straight forward to ship and share powerful tools that can interoperate with others components (on a GH canevas for instance). And the build-in toolbox to manipulate geometry is also very useful.

So why would I recommend Julia for rhino & grasshopper ?

=> you get a nice modern programming language which targets performance
=> it’s cross platform and have a proper C Interface (cool for interop capabilities)
=> it’s open source and yet gets a very active community where you can find quality support
=> it ships natively with super fast LinearAlgebra (OpenBLAS & LAPACK ; MKL)
=> there are yet lots of powerful packages for optimization JuliaOPT and many more …

I think rhinopython (based on IronPython) or C#, while very useful, doesn’t provide such an interesting ecosytem for high performance computations. And lots of people around here are dealing with such problematic … so it may be an interesting feature to explore in a near future ?

Of course, this is just my personal thought !
Anyway, I’m really looking for tips to link my julia code with grasshopper … if anyone can help …

Cheers,
Lionel

Unless Julia tightly integrated with the .NET Framework, then there isn’t much chance of getting it to work with Grasshopper (or RhinoCommon).