Detecting Naked Edges


#1

Is there a way to detect naked edges, or edges that are out of alignment, without having to join the surfaces and do ZoomNaked? It’s almost like there should be an analysis tool that can identify close edges (those that look like joining may be the ultimate intention) and color according to continuity (naked, position, tangency and curvature).


(David Cockey) #2

ShowEdges with the Naked Edges option selected shows naked edges of surfaces and polysurfaces. Make sure the Edge Color contrasts with the model.


(Pascal Golay) #3

Hi Lawrence - you can use CrvDeviation to query pairs of edges - does that do anything you like?

-Pascal


#4

I tried CrvDeviation on edges that would join and edges that would not join, but in either case it gave me a number. Neither numbers were 0. Does a number smaller than my model tolerance indicate that the edges will join properly?

For me, the ideal would be an analysis tool like does something like CrvDeviation on all edges that are close to each other and color them depending on it they would or would not join. The point is to eliminate the need to join the surfaces before zooming for naked edge. I often find myself in a situation where I do a matchsrf to fix one edge only to have it change an adjacent edge just enough that when I join everything it becomes a naked edge.


#5

Yes that is the general idea. Edges will join even if they are a little over the document tolerance. Joining works when the new joined edge will be within tolerance of both surfaces. [quote=“lawrenceyy, post:4, topic:43214”]

the ideal would be an analysis tool like does something like CrvDeviation on all edges that are close to each other and color them depending on it they would or would not join. The point is to eliminate the need to join the surfaces before zooming for naked edge.
[/quote]

That’s a valid point. The fact is, that when you join surfaces it permanently loses the original edge definitions of the surfaces (assuming you don’t undo the join). That means that you can make a mess of the edge definitions if you join surfaces that are not well matched and ready to join. So yeah, it would be a good thing to be able to know where joining is going to fail so that you can address the problem before joining. .

You can usually avoid that problem by using the “preserve isocurve direction” MatchSrf option. Matching multiple edges at once may help also.