“Command history” (list of commands used) suggestion


#1

Hello,

It would be great if the command history (list of commands used) was:

  1. stored with the .3dm file when closing the file,
  2. continuously updated when opening the .3dm file

This way we would always have stored the way a file was created.
What do you think ?

Cheers


#2

I’ve created a plugin a while ago for someone with the same isue.

It stores the commands within the file as SetUserDocumentText and also counts how many times a command is used.

There a 2 Commands in it:

  • RemindCommand : Shows a form with the command that are used
  • RemindDelete : Removes the commands that are stored within the file.

If a file is opened later you can run the command and see which commands are used.

One Warning! By using this can slow down some commands or scripts!
A button with a RunScript in it will show RunScript as command and not the commands used within.

RemindCommands.rhp (18 KB)


#3

My question is always: how useful is this really if you don’t know what objects were selected for various operations, what screen picks were made, etc… Just the commands used alone does not give you a “recipe” for re-creating a model…

–Mitch


#4

True. You know when for example Move is used but you dont know which object and location From and where To. But if you save these 2 you can undo any command given on any time :sunglasses: Maybe :stuck_out_tongue:


#5

Many thanks Jordy, I will give it a try !

Mitch, I am an ocasional Rhino instructor and :

  1. The kids are sometimes overwelmed by the sheer number of commands, specially in the beginning of the course, and like to keep a track of their use in the models

  2. When grading exams, I am very much interested to have another tool to check how the model was made

  3. and if it was indeed the student that made the model !

With internet acess during tests, I already caught this year 3 complete frauds (one student emailing the other with the model finished ) ,

Cheers


#6

Yeah, I can understand that.  I have 160 university students in my class, and we have also had examples of models being passed around. Usually we catch those, but it isn’t always easy.  I try to set up projects so that’s it’s nearly impossible to copy someone else’s model (everyone has a different set of conditions to fulfill), but that also makes it more difficult to evaluate…

I always figure that in a university environment, if a student tries to get out of doing an assignment illegally, they’re basically just cheating themselves… So yeah, maybe they get an unjustified grade, but that’s not really going to help them later on when they need to really know the stuff.

–Mitch


#7

I always figure that in a university environment, if a student tries to get out of doing an assignment illegally, they’re basically just cheating themselves… So yeah, maybe they get an unjustified grade, but that’s not really going to help them later on when they need to really know the stuff.

I agree entirely Mitch, but it´s also a fraud to a 3rd party: the future employers that will hire that person. The learning institution will also be badly rated for outputting persons that basically do not know how to model.
In this era of very easy digital “copy-paste” one has to keep a very watchful eye on frauds.

Cheers


#8

True enough, but you can also spend a lot of time tracking this stuff… I don’t really have any answers here.

As I said, I try to create projects that are difficult to copy… I had 3 students who submitted an incredibly good final project a few weeks ago - so much so that the other instructor and I spent a fair amount of time googling downloadable models to see if they had found it online somewhere - to no avail. Finally I called each student in individually and had them explain to me how they built certain critical parts. In all three cases they were able to describe the procedure they used, and it was logical. They were just excellent students who really got into the project is all, phew… On the other hand, we had one guy who did his model in Blender instead of Rhino, and that was easy to see, it was all meshes… :slight_smile:

–Mitch


#9

That one was not too difficult to spot :slight_smile:

Cheers !