Apple Silicon/M1 - No for now

Would an analyser app do this then. Maybe a Rhino file viewer would be sufficient for that. That would actually be a good idea for an app.

After sketching my ideas on paper I usually have a few quick and dirty Rhino-mockups that I will have in an extra layer (for orientation etc.) before starting serious modelling. A simplified iPad version for the ideation process and simple modelling would be a great tool. The iPad is very handy and efficient and I could later continue on my computer (using a cloud service). As an iPad is not a fully replacement for a computer it is a great addition - probably for Rhino as well.

3 Likes

Yes, we often discuss some issues with structural engineers and factories. Every angle of rotating and viewing the model is the most important. Of course, if the APP can add some functions, such as marking, switching wireframe mode, cross section, etc. I look forward to it very much, it will be very effective for our work.

Yes, I think analyzing and viewing would be good but simple modelling would be wanted. I have not really used modelling software with the pen as shapr3d but can imagine that it has some benefits for quick and dirty mockup modelling in the ideation process. The iPad is also very handy and it would be perfect to use it. With less functionality (less complexity), a cheaper price and a pen optimized GUI I can imagine that it would also be interesting for some hobby maker - what I would appreciate. But anyway, I myself would see a very helpful coexistence of two versions. For bigger projects I can`t imagine using an iPad - so there would be no competition. I would definitely preferer a Rhino version instead of shapr3d or what ever because I know that I continue modeling on the computer - if possible to use the same file and maybe even switch between iPad and Mac/PC it would be very cool.

Looking at the statement from November 25, this gave me a sinking feeling:

Rosetta doesn’t work with Rhino, yet. Many of the issues are OpenGL related, and may be OpenGL driver issues. We will file driver issues with Apple as we get more information. Problems we can fix, we will fix in Rhino 7.

What this doesn’t mention is, OpenGL has been deprecated on Mac for years. It was already deprecated when Rhino 6 was released; I think Apple had announced that before there even was a Mac Rhino. It wouldn’t have been a total surprise if they hadn’t supported OpenGL on the M1 at all.

I understand that a truly native Mac version of Rhino would mean a lot of work, and if the cross-platform approach works OK, that’s fine with me. But it sounds like that technical debt is already a big problem, and Metal still isn’t even on the roadmap. As far as I can see, by September, Rhino might simply not be able to run on new Mac models.

I’m not trying to be the voice of doom here. Rhino is delightful to me, and I will be upgrading to version 7 as soon as my local reseller is back in the office. I’m just saying, if the Mac Rhino developers need to spend a year or two on technical debt instead of new features, I support that, because more than anything, I want to be able to keep using Rhino the next time I upgrade my computer.

(I literally just replaced my aging 13" MBP. I really wanted the M1 model, but I had to get the significantly worse and more expensive Intel version, mainly because of Rhino, which is why I am feeling very aware of how much I depend on the fine folks at McNeel)

Hi -

See this thread:


-wim

1 Like

Oh. Good!

Since OpenGL is still a live technology, as a developer, I would hesitate about porting all the code onto a platform-specific API set. The same applies to why Rhino on Windows doesn’t use DirectX.

It’s sort of techinical debt. But I’d rather contribute it to whether a developer/company has the resources to develop on two distinct graphical subsystems.

Anyway, I hope Rhino to have a d3d subsytem as the stablity is better than OpenGL.

1 Like

OpenGL is actually a very nice technology. Once you understand VBO’s and VAO’s, it’s pretty straightforward. Vulkan or DirectX in comparison has much steeper learning curve. It’s really sad that OpenGL is threaded as an obsolete tech.

Apparently it slows down Rhino mac when displaying curves and hatches. That seems to bring a laggy performance when drafting 2d drawings or opening large dwg references. Display speed is simply crucial for any application in 2020.

OpenGL is extremely low level, it’s not slowing down rendering in first place, it’s more an interface to write almost directly to the gpu. If there are performance issues, than this can be due to issues with Rhino for Mac or Apples OpenGL implementation, or because of having a weak gpu. On Windows it’s working perfectly fine.

Also these are Apple’s entry level devices for the home user. This will be the slowest/worst performance coming from Apple.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KE-hrWTgDjk&feature=emb_logo

What is different? What do you mean with “upgraded version” – did I miss sth.?

Hi -

You didn’t miss anything. That description was a list of feature requests.
-wim