Accessing Rhino remotely on local network?


#1

Anyone doing that?

As I’m talking about a local network, I am thinking about having OpenGL be rendered by the server’s graphics card. It seems that Windows does not support this. However, the Oracle Blog shows a solution that involves wrapping Windows in a virtual machine running on Linux. What happens is that the OpenGL commands get forwarded from Windows to Linux. On Linux, a software called VirtualGL sends the OpenGL commands to the graphics card. The output from the graphics card is captured as bitmap data and sent to the client via TurboVNC.

If there is a simpler way, I’d like to hear about it.

I also asked on the GamingAnywhere forum. GamingAnywhere is an Open Source software for streaming games remotely. Perhaps it can also be used for productivity applications.


#2

Gaming Anywhere runs the game on a server and then stream input from client to server and then streams video and sound back to the client. I have never heard of a solution where only the graphics is handleded on a an external machine.

I used to have LogMeIn on my server and that used to let me remotely control the machine, but this never gave me a good enoght framerate for work, it was merely a solution I used to check files when I was on the run. This was before I used Dropbox and SkyDrive and I removed it due to security issues.

What kind of OpenGL sollution do you have on your server?


#3

[quote=“Holo, post:2, topic:4881, full:true”]
Gaming Anywhere runs the game on a server and then stream input from client to server and then streams video and sound back to the client.[/quote]

Replace “game” by “Rhino”, and remove “sound”. Then you have what I want.

Rhino would also run on the server. What makes things a bit special is that the server’s graphics card should be used to render OpenGL to bitmaps. The popular remote desktop solutions cannot do that.

No surprise. The problem is that all remote desktop solutions that I’m aware of (RDP, VNC, etc.) encode each frame individually. Video codecs, on the other hand, encode a stream of frames, which normally is way more efficient.

It’s just hypothetical at the moment.